DSpace Repository

Long-Lasting Insecticide Net Ownership, Access and Use in Southwest Ethiopia: A Community-Based Cross-Sectional Study

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author Seyoum, Dinberu
dc.contributor.author Speybroeck, Niko
dc.contributor.author Duchateau, Luc
dc.contributor.author Brandt, Patrick
dc.contributor.author Rosas-Aguirre, Angel
dc.date.accessioned 2019-01-25T15:28:05Z
dc.date.available 2019-01-25T15:28:05Z
dc.date.issued 2017
dc.identifier.uri http://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph14111312
dc.identifier.uri http://repositorio.upch.edu.pe/handle/upch/4692
dc.description.abstract Introduction:A large proportion of the Ethiopian population (approximately 68%) lives in malaria risk areas. Millions of long-lasting insecticide treated nets (LLINs) have been distributed as part of the malaria prevention and control strategy in the country. This study assessed the ownership, access and use of LLNs in the malaria endemic southwest Ethiopia. Methods: A community-based cross-sectional study was conducted in southwest Ethiopia during October-November 2015, including 836 households from sixteen villages around Gilgel-Gibe dam area. Indicators of ownership, access and use of LLINs were derived following the Roll Back Malaria (RBM) guidelines. Factors associated with failure for both LLIN access and use were analysed at household level using a multivariate logistic regression model. Results: The proportion of households with at least one LLIN was 82.7% (95% CI: 80.0, 85.1). However, only 68.9% (95% CI: 65.6, 71.9) had enough LLINs to cover all family members (with ≥one LLIN for every two persons). While 75.3% (95% CI: 68.4, 83.0) of the population was estimated to have accessed to LLINs, only 63.8% (95% CI: 62.3, 65.2) reported to have used a LLIN the previous night. The intra-household gap (i.e., households owning at least one LLIN, but unable to cover all family members) and the behavioral gap (i.e., household members who did not sleep under a LLIN despite having access to one) were 16.8% and 10.5%, respectively. Age, marital status and education of household heads, as well as household size and cooking using firewood were associated with the access to enough LLINs within households. Decreased access to LLINs at households was the main determinant for not achieving ≥80% household members sleeping under a LLIN the previous night. Other associated factors were household size and education level of household head. Conclusions: LLIN coverage levels in study villages remain below national targets of 100% for ownership and 80% for use. The access to enough LLINs within the households is the main restriction of LLIN use in the study area.
dc.language.iso eng
dc.publisher MPDI
dc.rights info:eu-repo/semantics/restrictedAccess
dc.rights.uri https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/deed.es
dc.subject access
dc.subject Ethiopia
dc.subject LLIN use
dc.subject long lasting insecticide treated net
dc.subject ownership
dc.subject Community-Based Participatory Research
dc.subject Cross-Sectional Studies
dc.subject Ethiopia
dc.subject Health Services Accessibility/statistics & numerical data
dc.subject Humans
dc.subject Insecticide-Treated Bednets/statistics & numerical data/utilization
dc.subject Malaria/prevention & control
dc.subject Ownership/statistics & numerical data
dc.title Long-Lasting Insecticide Net Ownership, Access and Use in Southwest Ethiopia: A Community-Based Cross-Sectional Study
dc.type info:eu-repo/semantics/article
dc.identifier.journal International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health


Files in this item

Files Size Format View

There are no files associated with this item.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

info:eu-repo/semantics/restrictedAccess Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as info:eu-repo/semantics/restrictedAccess

Search DSpace


Browse

My Account

Statistics