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Perceived stress and high fat intake: A study in a sample of undergraduate students

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dc.contributor.author Vidal, E. Jair
dc.contributor.author Alvarez, Daily
dc.contributor.author Martinez-Velarde, Dalia
dc.contributor.author Vidal-Damas, Lorena
dc.contributor.author Yuncar-Rojas, Kelly A.
dc.contributor.author Julca-Malca, Alesia
dc.contributor.author Bernabe-Ortiz, Antonio
dc.date.accessioned 2018-11-30T22:50:35Z
dc.date.available 2018-11-30T22:50:35Z
dc.date.issued 2018
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12866/4148
dc.description.abstract OBJECTIVES: Different studies have reported the association between perceived stress and unhealthy diet choices. We aimed to determine whether there is a relationship between perceived stress and fat intake among undergraduate medical students. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A cross-sectional study was performed including first-year medical students. The outcome of interest was the self-report of fat intake assessed using the Block Screening Questionnaire for Fat Intake (high vs. low intake), whereas the exposure was perceived stress (low/normal vs. high levels). The prevalence of high fat intake was estimated and the association of interest was determined using prevalence ratios (PR) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI). Models were created utilizing Poisson regression with robust standard errors. Data from 523 students were analyzed, 52.0% female, mean age 19.0 (SD 1.7) years. The prevalence of high fat intake was 42.4% (CI: 38.2%-46.7%). In multivariate model and compared with those with lowest levels of stress, those in the middle (PR = 1.59; 95%CI: 1.20-2.12) and highest (PR = 1.92; 95%CI: 1.46-2.53) categories of perceived stress had greater prevalence of fat intake. Gender was an effect modifier of this association (p = 0.008). CONCLUSIONS: Greater levels of perceived stress were associated with higher fat intake, and this association was stronger among males. More than 40% of students reported having high fat consumption. Our results suggest the need to implement strategies that promote decreased fat intake. en_US
dc.language.iso eng
dc.publisher PLoS
dc.relation.ispartof urn:issn:1932-6203
dc.rights info:eu-repo/semantics/restrictedAccess
dc.rights.uri https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/deed.es
dc.subject Adolescent en_US
dc.subject Adult en_US
dc.subject Female en_US
dc.subject Humans en_US
dc.subject Male en_US
dc.subject Sex Factors en_US
dc.subject Age Factors en_US
dc.subject Dietary Fats en_US
dc.subject Eating en_US
dc.subject Education, Medical, Undergraduate en_US
dc.subject Food Preferences en_US
dc.subject Students, Medical en_US
dc.title Perceived stress and high fat intake: A study in a sample of undergraduate students en_US
dc.type info:eu-repo/semantics/article
dc.identifier.doi https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0192827
dc.subject.ocde https://purl.org/pe-repo/ocde/ford#3.02.00 es_PE
dc.subject.ocde https://purl.org/pe-repo/ocde/ford#5.01.00


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