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The relationship between neighborhood-level socioeconomic characteristics and individual mental disorders in five cities in Latin America: multilevel models from the World Mental Health Surveys

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dc.contributor.author Sampson, L.
dc.contributor.author Martins, S.S.
dc.contributor.author Yu, S.
dc.contributor.author Chiavegatto, Filho, A.D.P.
dc.contributor.author Andrade, L.H.
dc.contributor.author Viana, M.C.
dc.contributor.author Medina-Mora, M.E.
dc.contributor.author Benjet, C.
dc.contributor.author Torres, Y.
dc.contributor.author Piazza, M.
dc.contributor.author Aguilar-Gaxiola, S.
dc.contributor.author Cia, A.H.
dc.contributor.author Stagnaro, J.C.
dc.contributor.author Zaslavsky, A.M.
dc.contributor.author Kessler, R.C.
dc.contributor.author Galea, S.
dc.date.accessioned 2019-04-24T18:23:59Z
dc.date.available 2019-04-24T18:23:59Z
dc.date.issued 2018
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12866/6503
dc.description.abstract Purpose: Our understanding of community-level predictors of individual mental disorders in large urban areas of lower income countries is limited. In particular, the proportion of migrant, unemployed, and poorly educated residents in neighborhoods of these urban areas may characterize group contexts and shape residents’ health. Methods: Cross-sectional household interviews of 7251 adults were completed across 83 neighborhoods of Buenos Aires, Argentina; Medellín, Colombia; São Paulo, Brazil; Lima, Peru; and Mexico City, Mexico as part of the World Mental Health Survey Initiative. Past-year internalizing and externalizing mental disorders were assessed, and multilevel models were used. Results: Living in neighborhoods with either an above-average or below-average proportion of migrants and highly educated residents was associated with lower odds of any internalizing disorder (for proportion migrants: OR 0.75, 95% CI 0.62–0.91 for the bottom tertile and OR 0.79, 95% CI 0.67–0.94 for the top tertile compared to the middle tertile; for proportion highly educated: OR 0.76, 95% CI 0.64–0.90 for the bottom tertile and OR 0.58, 95% CI 0.37–0.90 for the top tertile compared to the middle tertile). Living in neighborhoods with an above-average proportion of unemployed individuals was associated with higher odds of having any internalizing disorder (OR 1.49, 95% CI 1.14–1.95 for the top tertile compared to the middle tertile). The proportion of highly educated residents was associated with lower odds of externalizing disorder (OR 0.54, 95% CI 0.31–0.93 for the top tertile compared to the middle tertile). Conclusions: The associations of neighborhood-level migration, unemployment, and education with individual-level odds of mental disorders highlight the importance of community context for understanding the burden of mental disorders among residents of rapidly urbanizing global settings. en_US
dc.language.iso eng
dc.publisher Springer
dc.relation.ispartof urn:issn:1433-9285
dc.rights info:eu-repo/semantics/restrictedAccess
dc.rights.uri https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/deed.es
dc.subject Urban health en_US
dc.subject Neighborhood effects en_US
dc.subject Internalizing disorders en_US
dc.subject Externalizing disorders en_US
dc.subject Latin America en_US
dc.title The relationship between neighborhood-level socioeconomic characteristics and individual mental disorders in five cities in Latin America: multilevel models from the World Mental Health Surveys en_US
dc.type info:eu-repo/semantics/article
dc.identifier.doi https://doi.org/10.1007/s00127-018-1595-x
dc.subject.ocde https://purl.org/pe-repo/ocde/ford#3.02.00 es_PE
dc.subject.ocde https://purl.org/pe-repo/ocde/ford#3.02.24
dc.subject.ocde https://purl.org/pe-repo/ocde/ford#3.03.09
dc.subject.ocde https://purl.org/pe-repo/ocde/ford#5.01.00


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